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explore-blog:

TIME shares this gorgeous enhanced-color image of Saturn’s rings taken by the Voyager 2 spacecraft in 1981. One can almost see Carl Sagan’s famous words about the Golden Record, which had sailed on the Voyager 1 four years earlier, emanate from the rings. 

explore-blog:

TIME shares this gorgeous enhanced-color image of Saturn’s rings taken by the Voyager 2 spacecraft in 1981. One can almost see Carl Sagan’s famous words about the Golden Record, which had sailed on the Voyager 1 four years earlier, emanate from the rings. 

bookmania:

The Manila International Book Fair 2014. I just wish it never ended.

(Source: thedreamfactoryofpeter, via thedemon-hauntedworld)

amnhnyc:

More than 20,000 species of plants and animals around the world are currently under threat of extinction, and hundreds vanish each year. We don’t always know the exact time of extinction, but for the Pinta Island giant tortoise, the date was June 24, 2012.

On that day, Lonesome George—the Galapagos Island tortoise now on display at the American Museum of Natural History, and the last known member of his species—died of natural causes. With him, his species, Chelonoidis abingdoni, vanished.

Over the last two years, Wildlife Preservations taxidermy experts have worked closely with Museum scientists to preserve Lonesome George as he appeared in life—down to a missing toenail on his left front foot.

Watch a video about the preservation process, and learn much more about Lonesome George

colchrishadfield:

This comet is spewing water, methane, methanol, ammonia & CO2 - the stuff of life. Intriguing. http://sci.esa.int/rosetta/54643-j-marks-the-spot-for-rosettas-lander/v

colchrishadfield:

This comet is spewing water, methane, methanol, ammonia & CO2 - the stuff of life. Intriguing. http://sci.esa.int/rosetta/54643-j-marks-the-spot-for-rosettas-lander/v

amnhnyc:

We’re welcoming the weekend with Lonesome George.
Be among the first visitors to see the famous Pinta Island tortoise who was the last of his kind when he died in 2012. Lonesome George will be on display at the Museum till January 4, 2015, when he will be returned to Ecuador as part of that country’s national patrimony.
Interesting stories from the past week:
See the fossil finds from a recent expedition to the Gobi Desert.
Black widows are among the few spider species harmful to people.
In a "bachelor band" of bighorn sheep, horn and body size determine rank.
Watch a trailer for Jalanan, featured in the 2014 Margaret Mead Film Festival.
Have a wonderful weekend!

amnhnyc:

We’re welcoming the weekend with Lonesome George.

Be among the first visitors to see the famous Pinta Island tortoise who was the last of his kind when he died in 2012. Lonesome George will be on display at the Museum till January 4, 2015, when he will be returned to Ecuador as part of that country’s national patrimony.

Interesting stories from the past week:

Have a wonderful weekend!

theaatproject:

On today’s date, September 18th, Leon Foucault was born. Well-noted for his demonstration of the Foucault Pendulum, which was conceived as a simple experiment to show the rotation of the Earth, Foucault also devised an early measurement of the speed of light, discovered eddy currents, and is credited with naming the gyroscope.
Happy 195th birthday, Monsieur Foucault!
[wikipedia]

theaatproject:

On today’s date, September 18th, Leon Foucault was born. Well-noted for his demonstration of the Foucault Pendulum, which was conceived as a simple experiment to show the rotation of the Earth, Foucault also devised an early measurement of the speed of light, discovered eddy currents, and is credited with naming the gyroscope.

Happy 195th birthday, Monsieur Foucault!

[wikipedia]

(via scinerds)

tasmaniabehindthescenery:

Mount Pleasant Radio Telescope Observatory
The University of Tasmania’s Mount Pleasant Radio Telescope Observatory under a brilliant night sky, thanks to @miaglastonbury. 
Grote Reber, an American pioneer of radio astronomy in the 1930s, made Tasmania his home in the 1950s because of its unique location at high magnetic latitude. He settled on the outskirts of Bothwell, a rural town 1 hour north-west of Hobart, and spent the next forty years working in partnership with the university and undertaking world-leading work in radio astronomy. 
Go Behind The Scenery here.
Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by Mia Glastonbury. 

tasmaniabehindthescenery:

Mount Pleasant Radio Telescope Observatory

The University of Tasmania’s Mount Pleasant Radio Telescope Observatory under a brilliant night sky, thanks to @miaglastonbury.

Grote Reber, an American pioneer of radio astronomy in the 1930s, made Tasmania his home in the 1950s because of its unique location at high magnetic latitude. He settled on the outskirts of Bothwell, a rural town 1 hour north-west of Hobart, and spent the next forty years working in partnership with the university and undertaking world-leading work in radio astronomy. 

Go Behind The Scenery here.

Photo Credit: Published on Instagram by Mia Glastonbury

(via thedemon-hauntedworld)

spaceexp:

Jupiter and Io

spaceexp:

Jupiter and Io

inlovewithgeosciences:

Palaeocoma egertoni
Geological time: Early Jurassic
Locality: United Kingdom

inlovewithgeosciences:

Palaeocoma egertoni

Geological time: Early Jurassic

Locality: United Kingdom

(via iaccidentallyallthephysics)