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projecthabu:

     Number 15, the last of it’s type ever made. The Apollo Saturn V Moon rocket was comprised of three stages. This first stage, referred to as the S-IC, was the most powerful section of the rocket. S-IC-15 was built with the intention of a Moon mission, but was ultimately used as a backup for the Skylab Space Station launcher.

     Once number 15 was completed, it marked the end of the Apollo era at NASA Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans, where she was built, and where she proudly stands today. I was recently able to take a behind the scenes tour of Michoud for Project Habu, and photographed her up close.

     While I was photographing, a number of dragonflies were flitting about around me. One was gracious enough to momentarily pose for me on a barbed wire fence near the rocket. It was an opportunity to capture two incredible flying machines together. It’s amazing how far we’ve come in the last century, from looking at flying animals and dreaming about putting ourselves in the air, to riding atop a column of 7.5 million pounds of thrust, bound for the Moon.

(via thedemon-hauntedworld)

the-social-recluse:

universe—cosmos:

Imagine how it would look if the Orion nebula is only four light years away - the distance the nearest star is to us, instead of 1,300 light years. It would be so bright that we wouldn’t be aware of the dark sky. We wouldn’t see other stars. The whole world would be the Orion nebula and the sun.

-The Universe 2x14: Nebulas

(via voronyzimoy)

yeahwriters:

strandbooks:

Naturally, The Strand kicks off the list.

Wow I’ve only been to 2 of these (Stand and McNally Jackson). I have a lot of wandering to do!

kqedscience:

Glow-in-the-dark sharks have specially adapted eyes, say scientists 
“In the “twilight zone” of the deep ocean, strange glowing sharks have evolved eyes that are adapted to see complex patterns of light in the dark, new research reveals.
These bioluminescent sharks have a higher density of light-sensitive cells in their retinas, and some species have even developed other visual adaptations that help them see the glimmering lights they use to signal to each other, find prey and camouflage themselves in this region where little light penetrates, according to a study published today (Aug. 6) in the journal PLOS ONE.”
Read more at The Christian Science Monitor.

kqedscience:

Glow-in-the-dark sharks have specially adapted eyes, say scientists

In the “twilight zone” of the deep ocean, strange glowing sharks have evolved eyes that are adapted to see complex patterns of light in the dark, new research reveals.

These bioluminescent sharks have a higher density of light-sensitive cells in their retinas, and some species have even developed other visual adaptations that help them see the glimmering lights they use to signal to each other, find prey and camouflage themselves in this region where little light penetrates, according to a study published today (Aug. 6) in the journal PLOS ONE.”

Read more at The Christian Science Monitor.

(via crooksh4nks)

randommarius:

“Phyllotactic Portrait of Fibonacci” by Robert BoschMathematical artist Robert Bosch created this picture by adapting a well-known portrait of the Italian mathematician Leonardo Pisano Bigollo (c. 1170—1250), who was better known as Fibonacci.Fibonacci described the sequence that bears his name in his 1202 book Liber Abaci, although the sequence was known to Indian mathematicians as early as the 6th century. The Fibonacci sequence begins 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, the key property being that each of the terms from the third term onwards is the sum of the preceding two terms. Fibonacci used his sequence to study the growth of a population of rabbits, under idealising assumptions. The sequence can be used to model various biological phenomena, including the arrangement of leaves on a stem, which is known as phyllotaxis. Robert Bosch used a model of phyllotaxis to produce this picture. He explains:Using a simple model of phyllotaxis (the process by which plant leaves or seeds are arranged on their stem), I positioned dots on a square canvas. By varying the radii of the dots, I made them resemble Fibonacci. Incidentally, the number of dots, 6765, is a Fibonacci number. So are the number of clockwise spirals (144) and counterclockwise spirals (233) formed by the dots. A framed version of this picture is currently being exhibited at the Bridges Exhibition at Gwacheon National Science Museum, Seoul. You can read more about the picture here: http://gallery.bridgesmathart.org/exhibitions/2014-bridges-conference/bobb. The same page discusses another version of the picture, also by Robert Bosch, but this time illustrating the Travelling Salesman problem. +Patrick Honner has posted about the other version of the picture here: https://plus.google.com/+PatrickHonner/posts/ALvhM8JK5kJ.Relevant linksRobert Bosch’s website: http://www.dominoartwork.com Wikipedia on Leonardo Fibonacci: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/FibonacciThe On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences on the Fibonacci numbers: http://oeis.org/A000045Fibonacci numbers in nature: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fibonacci_number#In_natureAs well as featuring in this picture, the Fibonacci number 6765 is the name of an asteroid: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/6765_Fibonacci“We’re also a band.” (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Fibonaccis)(Found via +Patrick Honner.)#art #artist #mathematics #scienceeverydayhttp://click-to-read-mo.re/p/8MYa/53e952d4

randommarius:

“Phyllotactic Portrait of Fibonacci” by Robert Bosch

Mathematical artist Robert Bosch created this picture by adapting a well-known portrait of the Italian mathematician Leonardo Pisano Bigollo (c. 1170—1250), who was better known as Fibonacci.

Fibonacci described the sequence that bears his name in his 1202 book Liber Abaci, although the sequence was known to Indian mathematicians as early as the 6th century. The Fibonacci sequence begins 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, the key property being that each of the terms from the third term onwards is the sum of the preceding two terms. 

Fibonacci used his sequence to study the growth of a population of rabbits, under idealising assumptions. The sequence can be used to model various biological phenomena, including the arrangement of leaves on a stem, which is known as phyllotaxis. Robert Bosch used a model of phyllotaxis to produce this picture. He explains:

Using a simple model of phyllotaxis (the process by which plant leaves or seeds are arranged on their stem), I positioned dots on a square canvas. By varying the radii of the dots, I made them resemble Fibonacci. Incidentally, the number of dots, 6765, is a Fibonacci number. So are the number of clockwise spirals (144) and counterclockwise spirals (233) formed by the dots. 

A framed version of this picture is currently being exhibited at the Bridges Exhibition at Gwacheon National Science Museum, Seoul. You can read more about the picture here: http://gallery.bridgesmathart.org/exhibitions/2014-bridges-conference/bobb. The same page discusses another version of the picture, also by Robert Bosch, but this time illustrating the Travelling Salesman problem. +Patrick Honner has posted about the other version of the picture here: https://plus.google.com/+PatrickHonner/posts/ALvhM8JK5kJ.

Relevant links

Robert Bosch’s website: http://www.dominoartwork.com 

Wikipedia on Leonardo Fibonacci: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fibonacci

The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences on the Fibonacci numbers: http://oeis.org/A000045

Fibonacci numbers in nature: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fibonacci_number#In_nature

As well as featuring in this picture, the Fibonacci number 6765 is the name of an asteroid: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/6765_Fibonacci

“We’re also a band.” (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Fibonaccis)

(Found via +Patrick Honner.)

#art #artist #mathematics #scienceeveryday

http://click-to-read-mo.re/p/8MYa/53e952d4

(via visualizingmath)

thecrashcourse:

Climate Change, Chaos, and The Little Ice Age - Crash Course World History 206

In which John Green teaches you about the Little Ice Age. The Little Ice Age was a period of global cooling that occurred from the 13th to the 19th centuries. This cooling was likely caused by a number of factors, including unusual solar activity and volcanic eruptions. The Little Ice Age greatly impacted human social orders, especially during the 17th century. When the climate changed, and weather became unpredictable, the world changed profoundly. Poor harvests led to hunger, which led to even less productivity, which even resulted in violent upheaval in a lot of places. All this from a little change in the temperature? Definitely.

(via fishingboatproceeds)

amnhnyc:

The weekend has arrived! Arachnophobes and ’philes alike will get a kick out the live animal exhibition Spiders Alive! See 20 species of live arachnids, get a close up view in the live spider presentations, and hop up on the climbable trapdoor spider. Learn more. 

This week you may have missed:

Have a great weekend!

geometricloci:

Parametric curves by[R-D]

La mia arte matematica. Queste figure ricordano vecchi merletti, solo che sono ottenute attraverso  equazioni.

Enjoy!

(via visualizingmath)

sciencesoup:

What’s up with all those giant volcanoes on Mars?
Mount Everest is an enormous and awe-inspiring sight, towering 9 kilometres above the Earth’s surface. But if you were to stick it on Mars right next to Olympus Mons, the largest volcano in the solar system, it would look foolishly small—Olympus Mons triples the height of Everest and spans the state of Arizona.
Mars is sprinkled with huge volcanoes, hundreds of kilometres in diameter and dozens of kilometres tall. The largest volcano on Earth, on the other hand, is Mauna Loa in Hawaii, which rises only 4 km above sea level.
So why is Mars blessed with these monsters of the solar system? Why doesn’t Earth have any massive lava-spewing structures?
Geology, my friends.
Earth’s crust is split up into plates that move and collide. Usually, volcanoes are formed at the boundaries where two plates meet, and one subducts below the other and melts in the heat below the surface. This melt rises as magma and causes volcanism.
But in some places on Earth, there are “hot spots” in the middle of plates, where magma rises up from the core-mantle mantle in plumes. When this magma is spewed up onto the surface, it cools and solidifies into rock, and over the years, the rock builds up and up. When plumes open out in the middle of the ocean, the magma builds islands.

Plumes are fixed, always pushing magma up to one spot, but the Earth’s plates don’t stop for anything. While the magma rises, the plates move over the hotspot—at a rate of only a few centimetres a year, but still, they move and take the newly-made volcanoes with them. So, gradually, the plates and volcanoes move on, while the plume remains in the same spot, building a whole new volcano on the next bit of the plate. As the plate moves on and on, the plume builds up a whole chain of islands, called island arcs. This is how the Hawaiian Islands were formed.

The island-volcanoes never get too big, because the plates keep moving onwards. On Mars, however, the volcanoes are enormous because the magma appears to keep rising, cooling and solidifying in the same place, taking its sweet time to build up colossal mounds of volcanic rock kilometres high.
So far, we’ve seen no volcanic arcs like we do on Earth, and this is generally taken as evidence that Mars has no tectonic plates.

sciencesoup:

What’s up with all those giant volcanoes on Mars?

Mount Everest is an enormous and awe-inspiring sight, towering 9 kilometres above the Earth’s surface. But if you were to stick it on Mars right next to Olympus Mons, the largest volcano in the solar system, it would look foolishly small—Olympus Mons triples the height of Everest and spans the state of Arizona.

Mars is sprinkled with huge volcanoes, hundreds of kilometres in diameter and dozens of kilometres tall. The largest volcano on Earth, on the other hand, is Mauna Loa in Hawaii, which rises only 4 km above sea level.

So why is Mars blessed with these monsters of the solar system? Why doesn’t Earth have any massive lava-spewing structures?

Geology, my friends.

Earth’s crust is split up into plates that move and collide. Usually, volcanoes are formed at the boundaries where two plates meet, and one subducts below the other and melts in the heat below the surface. This melt rises as magma and causes volcanism.

But in some places on Earth, there are “hot spots” in the middle of plates, where magma rises up from the core-mantle mantle in plumes. When this magma is spewed up onto the surface, it cools and solidifies into rock, and over the years, the rock builds up and up. When plumes open out in the middle of the ocean, the magma builds islands.

image

Plumes are fixed, always pushing magma up to one spot, but the Earth’s plates don’t stop for anything. While the magma rises, the plates move over the hotspot—at a rate of only a few centimetres a year, but still, they move and take the newly-made volcanoes with them. So, gradually, the plates and volcanoes move on, while the plume remains in the same spot, building a whole new volcano on the next bit of the plate. As the plate moves on and on, the plume builds up a whole chain of islands, called island arcs. This is how the Hawaiian Islands were formed.

image

The island-volcanoes never get too big, because the plates keep moving onwards. On Mars, however, the volcanoes are enormous because the magma appears to keep rising, cooling and solidifying in the same place, taking its sweet time to build up colossal mounds of volcanic rock kilometres high.

So far, we’ve seen no volcanic arcs like we do on Earth, and this is generally taken as evidence that Mars has no tectonic plates.

(via iaccidentallyallthephysics)

heythereuniverse:

Moth wing scales | wellcome images

heythereuniverse:

Moth wing scales | wellcome images

(via iaccidentallyallthephysics)