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thatscienceguy:

Strange, Wonderful, and Beautiful organisms:

  1. Chromodoris Willani Blue (blue sea slug)
  2. Stemonitis fusca
  3. Coral
  4. Squidworm
  5. Sunda Colugo
  6. Christmas Tree Worm
  7. Panda Ant

(via iaccidentallyallthephysics)

skunkbear:

First prize in Science’s Visualization Challenge (video category) went to this NASA video by Greg Shirah, Horace Mitchell, and Tom Bridgman. It shows Earth’s “climate engine” — the wind patterns and ocean currents that are powered by the sun.

(Source: cosmosontv, via thedemon-hauntedworld)

bookgeekconfessions:

The Classics

Browse works by Mark Twain, Joseph Conrad and other famous authors here.

  1. Classic Bookshelf: This site has put classic novels online, from Charles Dickens to Charlotte Bronte.
  2. The Online Books Page: The University of Pennsylvania hosts this book…

(via oohshinee)

itscolossal:

Slow Life: A Macro Timelapse of Coral, Sponges and Other Aquatic Organisms Created from 150,000 Photographs [VIDEO]

(via iaccidentallyallthephysics)

anatomical chocolate

(Source: moshita, via dutchster)

curiosamathematica:

Infinite trip into Menger’s sponge.

curiosamathematica:

Infinite trip into Menger’s sponge.

(Source: rememberyouaredreaming, via staceythinx)

policymic:

Engineering company Festo is creating robots based on nature

German engineering firm Festo is creating a robot army. Sounds scary, right? But there’s no need to fear a “Skynet”-type apocalypse quite yet, because these robots want to do good by making laborious tasks easier in the factories of the future. And they’re using nature as their inspiration.

Festo summarizes the motivation behind their research on their website: “Gripping, moving, controlling and measuring – nature performs all of these tasks instinctively, easily and efficiently. What could be more logical than to examine these natural phenomena and learn from them?”

Read moreFollow @policymic

(via theravensofwinter)

fer1972:

Fross Reliquaries: Photography by Brandon Ballengée

(via staceythinx)

megacosms:

Closeup of the Helix Nebula.
Credit: NASA, NOAO, ESA, the Hubble Helix Nebula Team, M. Meixner (STScI), and T.A. Rector (NRAO).

megacosms:

Closeup of the Helix Nebula.

Credit: NASA, NOAO, ESA, the Hubble Helix Nebula Team, M. Meixner (STScI), and T.A. Rector (NRAO).

(Source: hubblesite.org, via iaccidentallyallthephysics)